Note: when native and non-native Wildlife: White-tailed deer commonly eat the entire leaf, leaving the plant leafless until the following autumn; because such plants accumulate fewer carbohydrates, they are much less likely to flower and produce fruits that year. They have an unusual lifestyle, similar to that of another orchid, Puttyroot (Aplectrum hyemale). The somewhat asymmetrical flowers of this species are pollinated by noctuid moths, the flower depositing a pollinarium (pollen mass) on either the left or right compound eye of the moth, depending on which way the column is twisted. leaf (with a purple underside) stands out in winter against the mostly grayish brown forest floor. Your help is appreciated. For details, please check with your state. Ecology: Hairy spiderwort copes with the extremely hot, dry summer environment of rock outcrops by actively growing primarily during the cooler months of late fall and spring. Flowers July-Sept.; fruits Aug.-Sept. Habitat/range: Variety of moist to dry forests, usually on acidic soils. Fruit a capsule. 1.  Carbohydrates stored in the shallow-rooted corm are used to produce a new leaf in fall, and flowers, fruits, and seeds in summer. A lack of sufficient nutrients and pollen transfer typically results in fewer than 25 percent of the flowers maturing fruit. the state. The solitary basal leaves of puttyroot (Aplectrum hymale) and crane-fly orchid (Tipularia discolor) are easily located from November into early spring. cranefly orchid. Radially symmetrical flowers with 3 petals and 6 stamens varying in color from blue to rose. The underside of the single leaf is purple, and it does not persist until flowering. All rights reserved. Box 1262, Bryson City, NC 28713. But as curious as it may seem, winter is the prime time to locate and identify two of our orchid species. (Pursh) Nutt. Purplish green to brown flowers in loose racemes. Although the plant is rather common throughout the Blue Ridge, it is inconspicuous when flowering in the shadowy woodland settings it favors. Western Carolina University biologist Dan Pittillo noted in an email that he is impressed by the sizeable "evolutionary leap" it required to implement a shift of  this magnitude. Then, as the flowering stems emerge in spring, the leaves wither and disappear. George Ellison is an award-winning naturalist and writer. Like Puttyroot, a Cranefly Orchid typically produces only one oval-shaped leaf, deep green on the top with a purple underside. state. Purplish green to brown flowers in loose racemes. Show you. All Characteristics, the plant has one or more swollen storage organs underground, such as bulbs, tubers or corms, there are only slender roots on the plant, this plant has a rhizome (a horizontal underground stem with roots growing from it), the leaf is pleated or folded back and forth along its length, the underside of the leaf is strongly tinted with pink, red, purple or reddish brown, the tip of the leaf blade is acuminate (tapers to a long, thin point), the tip of the leaf blade is acute (sharply pointed). (Wetland indicator code: post evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). Southeastern United States, west to Arkansas and Oklahoma. The tiny seeds (with very small nutrient reserves) require specific fungi for both seed germination and seedling growth. Crane-fly orchid derives its common name from the fancied resemblance of the delicate flowers to the insect of that name. The small seeds are dispersed by gravity and by the flow of surface water following rain. NC. is shown on the map. Tipularia discolor tall with linear leaves and parallel veins. Exact status definitions can vary from state to The cranefly orchid has coopted nocturnal moths in the family Noctuidae for pollination. The somewhat asymmetrical flowers of this species are pollinated by noctuid moths, the flower depositing a pollinarium (pollen mass) on either the left or right compound eye of the moth, depending on which way the … We depend on In the Blue Ridge there are about fifty native orchid species. Description: A perennial with a single annual leaf arising from a small corm, dull green above, purple below, emerging in fall, withering and disappearing in mid-to late spring before flowering. Description: Densely hairy perennial herb up to 15 in. Description: A perennial with a single annual leaf arising from a small corm, dull green above, purple below, emerging in fall, withering and disappearing in mid-to late spring before flowering. To reuse an The upper side is dark green and purple spotted with wart-like bumps, so that, in some ways, it resembles a toad's back. It is the only species of the genus Tipularia found in North America. Deciduous forests and woodlands on sandy soils, often near upland edge of swamps and ponds. those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). Cranefly Orchid becomes less common in the northern- and southern-most parts of its range. It is … Ecology: This relatively common orchid is easily missed because it's leafless in summer when the plant flowers and the slender flowering stalk and flowers blend in with leaf litter on the forest floor. FACU). MA; Cape Cod region. Go Botany: Native Plant Trust The Crane-fly Orchid ( Tipularia discolor ), or crippled crane-fly, is a perennial terrestrial woodland orchid, a member of the Orchidaceae. Can you please help us? Also covers Common. Spiderworts (Tradescantia) and dayflowers (Com-melina) are similar but the flowers of spiderworts aren't enclosed in a spathe and their 3 petals are uniform in size and color. State documented: documented donations to help keep this site free and up to date for Your California Privacy Rights/Privacy Policy. All images and text © 2-4 in. The Go Botany project is supported This week's takes a closer look at crane-fly orchid leaves. Tradescantia hirsuticaulis Small hairy spiderwort. The large, showy flowers depend on large bees (mainly bumblebees) for successful pollination. (intentionally or in part by the National Science Foundation. Take a photo and Also, by reflecting sunlight, the densely hairy leaves remain relatively cool, which in turn reduces evaporative water loss from the leaf surface. Uses: Spiderworts have been used to detect air pollutants, including radioactive particles, as significant exposure to such chemicals causes the anther filaments to change from blue to pink. Cranefly orchid is a rare orchid found in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and in the southeastern states. Spiderworts are occasionally grown in gardens for their showy flowers and attractive foliage. Taxonomy: A genus of 3 species — 1 in the eastern United States, the Himalayas, and Japan. These moths find the flowers soon after they open and stick around only as long as there is nectar still present in the long nectar spurs. Crane-fly orchid derives its common name from the fancied resemblance of the delicate flowers to the insect of that name.